Build Notes

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CanoeFrame
We'll throw up some not-quite-random notes that have occurred to us as we've built this first canoe. In time we hope this can become a knowledge base that will be of service to future builders of this kind of boat

- Tools that work

 - Shopsmith disk sander (?" diameter)
 - drum sander... need to improve it: currently just aluminum stock, abrasive-wrapped, chucked into the lathe
 - table saw with featherboard
 - awl/pick (piercing station molds for wiring stringers on)
 - thin wire

- Tools needed

 - infeed and outfeed rollers for tablesaw
 - zero-clearance insert for tablesaw (cardboard over the existing insert worked in a pinch)
 - bandsaw (edit: now we have one!)
 - double-sided tape: hold saw guide to stem, for instance

- Processes that work

 - pencil line on strongback
   - didn't do taut wire, seems ok
   - helps that strongback is very rigid and flat
   - but: maybe would have helped avoid the swayback observed in Canoe1
 - wiring stringers to station molds: 
   - enables single-handed stringer installation
   - assists even when workers are plenty
 - adhering temporary clamp-holding wedges to stringer ends
   - CA glue is easy to knock loose later
   - strong double-sided masking tape may serve as well
   - friction tape on angle blocks could eliminate need for adhesion to stringers
 - rubber band clamping stringers to stems
   - enables stringer-stem adhesion without the temporary clamp-holding wedges
   - install rubber bands onto stringers first, then tighten them and hold tight with a wire wrap
 - lashing the ribs to stringers
   - use artificial sinew: beeswax impregnated nylon, available at leather stores
   - use a square lashing technique, frap clockwise then spiral clockwise up the rib to the next junction. (if that detail worries you :-)
   - but: epoxy may actually be best: 
     -after lashing, additional sanding is very tricky, both on bare wood and after sealing the wood
     -the wax from the sinew bleeds through the Dacron during the heat shrinking process

- Processes that need refinement

 - assembling + adhering stem assembly
   - need flat surface, nonstick (maybe bluetape)
   - maybe nail in place?
 - 2"x4" as station mold cleat
   - adequate, but...
   - could be more right-angled if tablesaw ripped to square section
   - remember to note beam width amidships before cutting free of strongbacks and removing molds
   - sand ALL stringers and ribs before assembly, sand smooth
     - far easier to do at this point
     - may reduce rib breakage during bending
     - consider aggressive roundover: may reduce weight, reduce skin stress
 - station molds: put the print side of the cardboard to the inside of the sandwich! Aesthetics...
 - stringer cutting
   - don't sweat it
   - cut, then sand to shape... use motor sander?
   - consider compound miter gauge?
 - ribs:
   - mark locations on strongback before building stringers on
   - clothes steamer was adequate, may need slightly bigger tube.
   - try to leave other tasks (sanding, etc.) for interstitial work during rib bending waits.
   - use lashing, maybe not waxy, to hold ribs instead of zipties.
 - wood finishing:
   - epoxy: use only if wet look is ok, plan many coats + sanding (don't use lashing)
   - other?
 - Dacron attachment
   - spend a little more time stretching and clamping at gunwales before fastening and shrinking.
   - get better controlled irons! Arduino + PID, please
 - Dacron shrinking
   - ditto re. irons
   - Heat 'n' Bond at ~250°F, also pre-shrink fabric there.
   - Next shrink fabric at ~300°F
   - Final shrink fabric at ~350°F

- Redesign/Improvement Ideas

 - Build Strongback with station locations planned
 - Build reusable station molds with retractable stringer hookers
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